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Remote sensing of changes in morphologyand physiology of trees under stress annual progress report, 30 September, 1968 by Charles E. Olson

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Published by Forestry Remote Sensing Laboratory, School of Forestry and Conservation, University of California in Berkeley, Calif .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Space photography,
  • Physiology,
  • Trees,
  • Remote sensing

Book details:

Edition Notes

At head of title: Remote sensing applications in forestry. Report of research performed under the auspices of the Forestry Remote Sensing Laboratory, School of Forestry and Conservation, University of California at Berkeley, a coordination task carried out in cooperation with U.S.D.A. Forest Service for Earth Resources Survey Program, Office of Space Sciences and Applications, National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Bibliography: leaf 35.

Other titlesRemote sensing applications in forestry.
Statementby Charles E. Olson, Jennifer M. Ward. -
ContributionsWard, Jennifer M., University of California, Berkeley. Forestry Remote Sensing Laboratory, United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Earth Resources Survey Program, United States. Forest Service
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 35 leaves :
Number of Pages35
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26463037M
OCLC/WorldCa2824053

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Download book Download PDF Download All Download JPEG Download Text Remote sensing of changes in morphology and physiology of trees under stress: annual progress report, 30 September /Cited by: 4.   Get this from a library! Remote sensing of changes in morphology and physiology of trees under stress: annual progress report, 30 September, [Charles E Olson; Wayne G Rhode; Jennifer M Ward; Forestry Remote Sensing Laboratory (Berkeley, Calif.); Earth Resources Survey Program (U.S.); United States. Forest Service.]. REMOTE SENSING APPLICATIONS IN FORESTRY REMOTE SENSING OF CHANGES IN MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF TREES UNDER STRESS N 7b2 - ' Charles E. Olson, Jr. Wayne Jennifer M. Ward School of Natural Resources University of Michigan Annual Progress Report 30 September A report of research performed under the auspices of the Forestry. Remote sensing of changes in morphologyand physiology of trees under stress: annual progress report, 30 September, / By Charles E. Olson, Jennifer M. Ward, United States. Forest Service., United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. .

Abstract. Measurements on foliage samples collected from several drought and salt treated plants revealed that leaf thickness decreased with increasing severity of the drought treatment and increased with increasing severity of treatment with NaCl, but remained essentially unaffected by . Remote sensing of changes in morphology and physiology of trees under stress. By Jr. C. E. Olson, J. M. Ward and W. G. Rohde. Abstract. Results of continuing studies of forest trees subjected to varying types of stress are reported. Both greenhouse and field studies are included. Greenhouse work with tree seedlings exposed to varying levels of. Remote sensing applications in forestry - Remote sensing of changes in morphology and physiology of trees under stress Annual progress report By J. M. Ward, Jr. C. E. Olson and W. G. Rohde Get PDF (24 MB).   It has been shown that remote sensing can provide useful and relevant forest information (Solberg, ). Historically, the potential of remote sensing for forest health studies remained limited for a variety of reasons. Most of the remote sensing data suffered from insufficient spatial, spectral, or temporal resolution.

Remote sensing offers an efficient and reliable means of collecting surface parameters required for many applications in crop model, flood monitoring and environment changes. Remote sensing of forest pest damage: a review and lessons learned from a Canadian perspective* - Volume Supplement - R.J. Hall, G. Castilla, J.C. White, B.J. Remote sensing has been utilized for national forest inventories for many decades, using mainly airborne, but increasingly, spaceborne remote sensing. Remotely sensed data have also been used at global level by FAO for the purpose of comparison and as complementary information, since Fire activity, in terms of intensity, frequency, and total area burned, is expected to increase with a changing climate. A challenge for landscape-level assessment of fire effects, often termed burn severity, is that current remote sensing assessments provide very little information regarding tree/vegetation physiological performance and recovery, limiting our understanding of fire effects on.